News Fall Out Night Life Olivia Rodrigo Said She Thinks Society “Holds Young Women To An Incredibly Unrealistic Standard” In Her New Rolling Stone Interview

Olivia Rodrigo Said She Thinks Society “Holds Young Women To An Incredibly Unrealistic Standard” In Her New Rolling Stone Interview



“I’ve never felt as deep a sadness as I did when I was truly, truly heartbroken and devastated.”

…that was then adopted by the discharge of her debut album, Sour, in May. (Also, a worldwide success.)

And then in a darker flip of occasions, over this previous summer time, followers began accusing Olivia of ripping off lyrics and melodies from different artists, which she handled gracefully.

Olivia has gone from “that girl on Disney’s High School Musical: The Musical: The Series” to a worldwide pop star within the span of some months. In a current Rolling Stone interview reverse Alanis Morissette, she touched on experiencing viral fame nearly “overnight.”

Rolling Stone / Via youtube.com

“At least for me, it felt super-quick,” she stated. “It felt overnight, and I’ve been working and writing songs since I was five years old. It definitely wasn’t overnight. But the ‘I’m writing songs in my bedroom,’ to ‘Oh, my gosh, lots of people know this song’ was really quick for me.”

She additionally defined the changes she’s needed to make in her personal life to have the ability to deal with the fixed scrutiny. “Putting out music in the age of social media can be really daunting, and I think people hold young women to an incredibly unrealistic standard,” she stated.

She went on so as to add: “It’s just hard for me because I had my first Instagram when I was 12 years old. So I completely had all of my adolescence in front of people, and I think it’s hard to differentiate who you are as a person versus who you are as a person on Instagram.”

Everyone that is heard “Driver’s License” (most likely even those who have not) can inform you it is a uncooked, emotional music. Olivia defined that making music is a “magical” expertise for her when noticed how her songs linked with others. “I think heartbreak is so universal — the feeling that lots of humans feel the most deeply,” she stated. “I’ve never felt as deep a sadness as I did when I was truly, truly heartbroken and devastated. And when I put out ‘Drivers License,’ about this really hard time in my life, I watched it just affect so many people , regardless of sexual orientation or gender or age.”

Olivia Rodrigo / Via giphy.com

“There would be 40-year-old guys that would come up to me and be like, ‘Wow, that really struck me.’ Even if they weren’t going through a situation like that, they were like, ‘Oh, it takes me right back to when I was in high school and I went through my first heartbreak.’ That was so magical for me, to not only see how universal that feeling was, but also how magical music can be and it can take you back to a specific point in time.”

She stated one of many greatest issues she’s realized is find out how to separate herself from her work as soon as it is out on the planet and open for interpretation. “I always think that creativity is sometimes really magical and celestial, and if you’re a vessel for an amazing song, that’s awesome, but sometimes it doesn’t have anything to do with you,” she stated. “I try to not attach a lot of ego to it.”

You can learn the total Rolling Stone interview here.

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