AOC casts doubt on inflation wave: Price will increase are ‘sector specific’ and may well be because of ‘supply-chain issues’


Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who represents parts of the Bronx and Queens in Congress, isn’t positive whether or not the fee will increase U.S. shoppers were experiencing are solely aligned with broader inflation concerns.

“When you look at what actual prices are going up, it’s in very specific sectors,” Ocasio-Cortez, widely identified as “AOC,” said during an interview with CNN on Monday. And circumscribed value strikes, to the New York Democrat, don’t scream “inflation”:

‘If this was an overall inflationary issue, we would see prices going up in relatively equal amounts across the board no matter what the good is.’

— Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Prices for more than a few U.S. items have higher not too long ago, reminiscent of cars, meat, lumber, housing and gas.

See additionally: Eggs and pancakes for dinner: How one family of seven is coping with America’s food inflation

“But we know it’s getting expensive,” the second-term House member persevered. “Things like the cost of lumber, items like cars, whether they are new or used and other sorts of items that rely on shipping and shipping containers coming in from overseas. These are very sector specific, which means that these are due to supply-chain issues.”

The COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on supply chains around the nation and past. Industries together with retail, agriculture and housing have been impacted by means of supply-chain disruptions associated with the pandemic.

As Ocasio-Cortez famous, lumber costs were on the upward thrust. Prices have been at record highs this year before stabilizing in recent months — the cost of lumber LBU21, -1.68% LB00, -1.68% had surged greater than 300% between April 2020 and May 2021.

Used-vehicle prices soared by means of 10.5% in June from a 12 months ahead of, following good points of seven.3% in May and 10% in April. The June upward thrust represented the biggest increase since 1953.

Partially because of considerations over the delta variant and inflation, U.S. markets tumbled on Monday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA, +1.62% fell 725.81 issues, or 2.1%, to near at 33,962.04, its largest one-day share and level drop since Oct. 28, 2020. The S&P 500 SPX, +1.52%   dropped 68.67 issues, or 1.6%, to finish at 4,258.49, whilst the Nasdaq Composite COMP, +1.57% shed 152.25 issues, or 1.1%, completing at 14,274.98 — the worst day for each indexes since May 12.

Stocks rebounded sharply on Tuesday, recapturing the majority of day-earlier losses.

Jerome Powell, chairman of the Federal Reserve, has said that pandemic-related shortages and bottlenecks are in the back of contemporary value spikes. He has predicted inflation will ease as the U.S. economy continues to reopen.

“Inflation has increased notably and will likely remain elevated in coming months before moderating,” Powell stated on July 14.

Key Words (July 2020): Watch Ocasio-Cortez demolish Florida Republican who called her ‘disgusting’ — and some other choice words



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